Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What attracts gamers
#1
https://rampages.us/univ200rc/2016/04/20...e-to-play/
Reply
#2
nice post. well written paper from an age 20 gamer.
Reply
#3
Trying to get some ideas on how we can breathe some new life into our group
Reply
#4
Good stuff.
Indeed he manages to show how the three main components of video games (reward systems, control features, and social interaction) attract people to play them constantly.

For the first two aspects he certainly got a point when claiming that "showing players their constant progress in the game as well as the people they are playing with", e.g. per checking the leader boards after every match, helps them to know how much better they can and want to do in the future. That's an immense stimulus. Luckily we got that on our servers.

The learning process that takes place while gaming plays a decisive role as well:
Quote:"When players are presented with a situation of sorts within a game, they instinctively assess the situation, weigh the possible actions that can be taken if any, execute them, and await result. As the player continues playing, the mind applies that previous information to current gameplay while still absorbing new information. [...] This uncertainty due to the freedom of interaction is what keeps players interested and keeps the games enjoyable."
Also it's important therefor, that a "game cannot just fit one style of player, others must be able to play and differing experiences". I would say that we're trying to live up to that goal by allowing various perks and gamestyles (rushing, camping, sniping, spraying, etc.) and offering several servers.

Personally to me the most essential part about what keeps gamers interested is the third component, the social interaction, because I think he is quite right when saying that "[p]eople are drawn to video through the inclusion of social aspects like competition, cooperation, and communication", which might be influences that "aren’t always apparent to the person that they affect, but [...] are ever-present in basically all online games".
This is strongly connected to what he is explicating in the passages about "Internalization (individuals look up to a group or leader and take on their values and goals as their own), Identification (a person purposely acts like a group or person in order to become closer to them) and Compliance (individual does what another wants in an attempt to gain something of benefit to them)".

It has always been about this for me. I kinda started gaming with the classical Gameboy, Gamegear and Supernintendo and even back then I tried to make it a social event by inviting friends to play together within self-made tents out of blankets and towels on the balcony or other cozy spots. What's a victory without someone to share the joy with? On the other hand no defeat is more bitter than a forlorn one. 
To exchange thoughts about a game can be so much more when it is done right, it's helping a shared vision to come alive, it's a tool to realize how others see the same world and it's revealing the gamer's true colors way beyond every game for those who listen and look carefully. Thus in its details it's a reflection of life.

So these forums, the in-game chat function and the TS are completing a successful gaming experience, making a stay and a return worthwhile.
Quote:"[Online games] are meant to be desirable, welcoming environments for socialization, comprised of eight characteristics: Neutral ground, status is of no importance, conversation is main activity, accessibility & accommodation, includes regulars, homely without pretension, playful mood, and a home away from home."
Let's keep this in mind when playing, writing and talking with each other.
[Image: giphy.gif] [Image: 9o49v1dnxqreizp6g.jpg]
A man will go to war, fight & die for his country. But he won't get a bikini wax. (R.Rudner) | Night air, good conversation & a sky full of stars can heal almost any wound. (B.Taplin)
Reply
#5
What attract me to play a game changed a lot over the years... Instead of commenting an existing article, I'd rather share my personal experience while trying to not deviate so much...

11 years ago, it was exciting playing CoD4 in a server with 40 to 64 players. Battling in all that chaos, high pings (around 160ms, but not jittery), and trying to be the top player of the map to save a screenshot was rewarding for me. Usually gaming community are toxic, but dedicated servers were the norm at that time, so the community formed around these servers and the sense of belonging to somewhere was great. I still remember fondly looking at screen captures from a decade ago.

The last FPS game that I felt really competitive, was CoD Black Ops 2. That game gave a feeling of actually progressing and evolving as you were unlocking stuff and doing prestiges over and over. I used to play with my closest friends, and we pushed ourselves to our limits. We never backed down even in a lobby full of hackers. Winning matches against them were among the best feelings I ever had.

Since then, my life took a dramatic turnaround. Well stuff like that happens as you grow older (I'm 32). I live alone, and because of pandemic, working from home, so I try few things to alleviate. Social interaction and co-operation is attractive these days. Joining Discord calls and talking to people of all ages while playing games on my day offs is fun. It also gives a sense of belonging somewhere as communities are formed. Often you meet good people, sometimes half your age and still learn something from them, while giving advice on the subjects that you can. Occasionally you meet overly toxic people, but nowadays that can't be avoided. So from a very good laugh to a very bitter deception, I guess that's what you get when you interact with different people.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)